Labor Day Weekend Pet Safety Tips

What will Labor Day weekend be like for you and your pet? We hope your extended weekend is stress-free and safe, whether you and your pet are lolling about on the patio, enjoying a late-summer party, or traveling to see loved ones. Reduce the chance of mishaps with these Labor Day weekend pet safety tips.

Before You Leave

PetMD recommends a number of steps for safely traveling with your furry pal, starting with proper pet identification. Make sure all tag and microchip information is accurate and up-to-date, just in case the two of you would become separated. If your pet isn’t a frequent traveler, take him on short trips ahead of time.

Be Prepared

Keep Fido in mind when you’re preparing your packing list – you never know when you’ll face a wrinkle in your plans. PetMD recommends compiling a first aid kit that includes items like gauze and bandages, as well as your pet’s medical records. Remember to bring along extra pet medication, food, and water.

On the Road Again

Though a dog’s blissful face sticking out the car window is one of summer’s most cherished images, PetMD recommends that you secure your pet at all times. Use an appropriate restraining harness that connects to the safety belt. If you use a carrier, ensure that it is well-ventilated, large enough for your pet, and secured inside the car. Never leave your pet alone in a hot car; even with the windows down a bit, the temperature can rise quickly and endanger your pet.

Fun in the Sun?

If you and your pet are spending time outdoors this weekend, have fun, but make sure you don’t overdo it. Avoid exercising during the hottest times of the day, and limit the intensity of activity in accordance with the temperature. Remember that your pet will need protection from the heat, including an open, shady area to rest and plenty of water to prevent dehydration. Swap outdoor fun for indoor quality time if your pet is elderly or ailing. The Humane Society reminds pet owners to be on the lookout for signs of heatstroke, such as heavy panting, difficulty breathing, and lack of coordination. Take your pet to a veterinarian if you suspect heatstroke.

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Filed under Dogs, Pet Safety

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